Analysis of john donnes the flea

It is found in open country rather than in settlements, which are occupied by the Eurasian tree sparrow in its range. It is migratory, like P. The lines alternate, octosyllabic 8 syllables and decasyllabic 10 syllables resulting in tetrameter and pentameter respectively.

The Latin word passer, like the English word "sparrow", is a term for small active birds, coming from a root word referring to speed. The Flea is structured to mirror the three protagonists, flea, man and woman, so there are three rhyming couplets, a triplet in each stanza and three stanzas.

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In that case the poet reasons, seductivelythe woman would feel no shame if she allowed herself to be seduced by the poet. Here is the poem, followed by a short summary and analysis of it. A classic of its type, The Flea, a provocative and intimate drama, with psychological and theological elements, raises serious sexual and moral questions but does so in a darkly playful manner.

Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail, in blood of innocence. As the beloved makes ready to kill the flea, the lover asks her to stay and not to kill the poor creature. In Renaissance England it was very much the thing for poets to use a conceit, an argument, an extended metaphor which would allow a comparison to be made between diverse and often strange things.

It resembles a hybrid between the two species, and is in other respects intermediate. Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail, in blood of innocence. The poet has said his piece, and ends by subtly joining himself with the woman verbally.

O stay, three lives in one flea spare, Where we almost, yea, more than married are. She kills the flea with her nail. Their blood is mingled, a successful act for the flea who doesn't have to bother with pleasantries, charm or promises to woo.

She has also lost no honour in this way. She has also lost no honour in this way. The Flea is a dramatic lyric. Now they have mingled in the flea, so its body is their marriage-bed.

The Flea by John Donne

The body regrets that such direct enjoyment and consummation is not possible for human beings. Korelov proposed the separation of the P. But the flea has enjoyed her without any wooing or courtship and its body is now swelled up with the enjoying of their respective bloods, which now mingle in its body.

Thus, like a clever lawyer Donne has argued his point home. In this respect, the flea is superior to them. Such poets envied the flea for it had a free excess to the body of the beloved, but such excess was denied to them. If a flea can suck blood from them both and mingle the two in one, surely it's not too much to ask for them to get together in similar fashion.

She must acknowledge that this mingling of their bloods in the body of the flea is neither sin, nor shame, nor loss of virginity. The phrase also refers to intercourse, a common event in the lives of newlyweds. The beloved is triumphant and says that neither she nor her lover is any way weaker for having killed it.

She must not kill the flea, for the act would not merely be cruelty to which she is used. She should notice that first it sucked his blood and then hers and in this way their blood mingle in its body, as they do in sexual intercourse. From this she should learn that her fears of losing her honour through yielding to the advances of her lover are false.

Later on in his life Donne became seriously involved in religion, eventually ending up as dean of St Paul's cathedral, London, in The poet in the poem, The Flea by John Donne, asks his beloved to observe the flea carefully and mark that what she denies to him is not of much significance.

The lover is the speaker and the beloved is the silent listener. The speaker is using these elevated terms in an ironic manner to try and convince the woman not to kill the flea and forego sex with him.

Each stanza contains alternating lines of iambic tetrameter and iambic pentameter with a closing iambic pentameter couplet. The poet has said his piece, and ends by subtly joining himself with the woman verbally.

In this respect, the Renaissance poets imitated Ovid who has a poem on the subject. Attitude towards Love By the third stanza, the beloved has already killed the innocent flea. In the third stanza the speaker, aware that she has killed the flea, is close to admitting defeat. John Donne: Poems Summary and Analysis of "The Flea" Buy Study Guide The speaker uses the occasion of a flea hopping from himself to a young lady as an excuse to argue that the two of them should make love.

Sep 07,  · The Flea is one of John Donne's most popular erotic poems. It focuses on an insect that was a common nuisance in the Renaissance period - the flea - and turns it into a sexual metaphor.

It focuses on an insect that was a common nuisance in the Renaissance period - the flea - and turns it into a sexual turnonepoundintoonemillion.coms: 2. John Donne’s Originality. The poem, The Flea by John Donne is one of the best lyrics of Donne’s poems. Flea was a very popular subject for ribald and amatory poetry during the Renaissance.

In this respect, the Renaissance poets imitated Ovid who has a poem on the subject. John Donne: Poems Summary and Analysis of "The Flea" Buy Study Guide The speaker uses the occasion of a flea hopping from himself to a young lady as an excuse to argue that the two of them should make love.

The Flea By John Donne. Mark but this flea, and mark in this, The Flea By John Donne About this Poet John Donne’s standing as a great English poet, and one of the greatest writers of English prose, is now assured.

However, it has been confirmed only in the early 20th century. The Flea by John Donne “The Flea”, a witty poem of seduction and conceit, taken from John Donne’s “Songs and Sonets” is the poem that I have chosen to compare to “Song”, another poem of John Donne’s where he is passionately pleading with his wife not to be disheartened about his departure abroad.

Analysis of john donnes the flea
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An Analysis of Poem "The Flea" by John Donne | Owlcation